AESOP'S FABLES - online children's book

300 favourite fables with illustrations by Arthur Rackham

Home Main Menu Order Support About Search

Share page  

Previous Contents Next

A FARMER set some traps in a field which he had lately sown with corn, in order to catch the cranes which came to pick up the seed. When he returned to look at his traps he found several cranes caught, and among them a Stork, which begged to be let go, and said, " You ought not to kill me : I am not a crane, but a Stork, as you can easily see by my feathers, and I am the most honest and harmless of birds." But the Farmer replied, " It's nothing to me what you are : I find you among these cranes, who ruin my crops, and, like them, you shall suffer."
If you choose bad companions no one will believe that you are anything but bad yourself.
A HORSE, who had been used to carry his rider into battle, felt himself growing old and chose to work in a mill instead. He now no longer found himself stepping out proudly to the beating of the drums, but was compelled to slave away all day grinding the corn. Bewailing his hard lot, he said one day to the Miller,
1 Ah me! I was once a splendid warhorse, gaily caparisoned, and attended by a groom whose sole duty was to see to my wants. How different is my present