AESOP'S FABLES - online children's book

300 favourite fables with illustrations by Arthur Rackham

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carried it home to his children. It looked so odd that they didn't know what to make of it. What sort of bird is it, father? " they asked. " It's a Jackdaw," he replied, " and nothing but a Jackdaw : but it wants to be taken for an Eagle."
If you attempt what is beyond your power, your trouble will be wasted and you court not only misfortune but ridicule.
THE WOLF AND THE BOY
A WOLF, who had just enjoyed a good meal and was in a playful mood, caught sight of a Boy lying flat upon the ground, and, realising that he was trying to hide, and that it was fear of himself that made him do this, he went up to him and said, " Aha, I've found you, you see; but if you can say three things to me, the truth of which cannot be disputed, I will spare your life." The Boy plucked up courage and thought for a moment, and then he said," First, it is a pity you saw me; secondly, I was a fool to let myself be seen ; and thirdly, we all hate wolves because they are always making unprovoked attacks upon our flocks." The Wolf replied, Well, what you say is true enough from your point of view; so you may go."
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