AESOP'S FABLES - online children's book

300 favourite fables with illustrations by Arthur Rackham

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Sister about his good looks : she, on her part, was ready to cry with vexation when she was aware of her plainness, and took his remarks as an insult to herself. Running to her father, she told him of her Brother's conceit, and accused him of meddling with his mother's things. He laughed and kissed them both, and said, a' My children, learn from now onwards to make a good use of the glass. You, my boy, strive to be as good as it shows you to be handsome; and you, my girl, resolve to make up for the plainness of your features by the sweetness of your disposition.'
A HEIFER went up to an Ox, who was strainmg hard at the plough, and sympathised with him in a rather patronising sort of way on the necessity of his having to work so hard. Not long afterwards there was a festival in the village and every one kept holiday : but, whereas the Ox was turned loose into the pasture, the Heifer was seized and led off to sacrifice. " Ah," said the Ox, with a grim smile, I see now why you were allowed to have such an idle time : it was because you were always intended for the altar."