AESOP'S FABLES - online children's book

300 favourite fables with illustrations by Arthur Rackham

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A Hedgehog saw him, and asked if he should brush away the flies that were tormenting him ; but the Fox replied, ' Oh, please, no, not on any account, for these flies have sucked their fill and are taking very little from me now ; but, if you drive them off, another swarm of hungry ones will come and suck all the blood I have left, and leave me without a drop in my veins."
A CROW became very jealous of a Raven, because the latter was regarded by men as a bird of omen which foretold the future, and was accordingly held in great respect by them. She was very anxious to get the same sort of reputation herself; and, one day, seeing some travellers approaching, she flew on to a branch of a tree at the roadside and cawed as loud as she could. The travellers were in some dismay at the sound, for they feared it might be a bad omen ; till one of them, spying the Crow, said to his companions, ' It's all right, my friends, we can go on without fear, for it's only a crow and that means nothing."
Those who pretend to be something they are not only make themselves ridiculous.