AESOP'S FABLES - online children's book

300 favourite fables with illustrations by Arthur Rackham

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who lives there, to come to my den : I have a fancy to make my dinner off a stag's heart and brains." The Fox went to the wood and found the Stag and said to him, '' My dear sir, you're in luck. You know the Lion, our King : well, he's at the point of death, and has appointed you his successor to rule over the beasts. I hope you won't forget that I was the first to bring you the good news. And now I must be going back to him ; and, if you take my advice, you'll come too and be with him at the last." The Stag was highly flattered, and followed the Fox to the Lion's den, suspecting nothing. No sooner had he got inside than the Lion sprang upon him, but he misjudged his spring, and the Stag got away with only his ears torn, and returned as fast as he could to the shelter of the wood. The Fox was much mortified, and the Lion, too, was dreadfully disappointed, for he was getting very hungry in spite of his illness. So he begged the Fox to have another try at coaxing the Stag to his den. " It'll be almost impossible this time," said the Fox, " but I'll try " ; and off he went to the wood a second time, and found the Stag resting and trying to recover from his fright. As soon as he saw the Fox he cried, " You scoundrel, what do you mean by trying to lure me to my death like that ? Take yourself off, or I'll do you to death with my horns." But the Fox was entirely shameless. " What a coward you were," said he ; " surely you didn't think the Lion meant any harm? Why, he was only going to whisper some royal secrets into your ear when you went off like a scared rabbit. You have rather disgusted him, and I'm not sure he won t