Alice Through The Looking-Glass

Illustrated children's book by Lewis Carroll - online version

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LOOKING-GLASS HOUSE.                      23
Then she began looking about, and noticed that' ■what could be seen from the old room was quite common and uninteresting, but that all the rest was as different as possible. For instance, the pictures on the wall next the fire seemed to be all alive, and the very clock on the chimney-piece (you know you can only see the back of it in the Looking-glass) had got the face of a little old man, and grinned at her.
" They don't keep this room so tidy as the other," Alice thought to herself, as she noticed several of the chessmen down in the hearth among the cinders: but in another moment, with a little " Oh!" of surprise, she was down on her hands and knees watching them. The chessmen were walking about, two and two !
"Here are the Red King and the Red Queen," Alice said (in a whisper, for fear of frightening -them), "and there are the White King and the White Queen sitting on the edge of the shovel
------and here are two Castles walking arm in arm
------1 don't think they can hear me," she went on
as she put her head closer down, "and I'm nearly sure they can't see me. I feel somehow as if I were invisible------"
Here something began squeaking on the table behind Alice, and made her turn her head just in time to see one of the White Pawns roll over apd