Alice Through The Looking-Glass

Illustrated children's book by Lewis Carroll - online version

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a fit, she hastily picked up the Queen and set her on the table by the side of her noisy little daughter.
The Queen gasped, and sat down: the rapid journey through the air had quite taken away her breath, and for a minute or two she could do nothing but hug the little Lily in silence. As soon as she had recovered her breath a little, she called out to the White King, who was sitting sulkily among the ashes, " Mind the volcano !"
"What volcano?" said the King, looking up anxiously into the fire, as if he thought that was the most likely place to find one.
" Blew------me------up," panted the Queen, who
was still a little out of breath. " Mind you come up-----the regular way------don't get blown up I "
Alice watched the White King as he slowly struggled up from bar to bar, till at last she said, " Why, you'll be hours and hours getting to the table, at that rate. I'd far better help you, hadn't I?" But the King took no notice of the ques­tion : it was quite clear that he could neither hear her nor see her.
So Alice picked him up very gently, and lifted him across more slowly than she had lifted the Queen, that she mightn't take his breath away: but, before she put him on the table, she thought