The American Pictorial Home Book
or Housekeeper's Encyclopedia - online book

A reference manual of household management in Victorian times.

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256
SWEET PUDDINGS.
from catching at the bottom of the sauce-pan. Pare 8 large apples fully ripe or green, take out the cores without cutting the fruit quite through, put a little raspberry jam into each hole and fill up with cream, edge a pie-dish with a rim of pie-paste, lay in the apples and level the spaces between them with boiled rice. Break over it the yolk of a hen's egg, dust it well with powdered loaf sugar; bake 40 minute in a quick oven. To be eaten warm.
Italian Pudding.—Take 1 pint of rich new cream, slice therein as much French roll as will make it thick, beat up 5 eggs, butter the bottom of a dish, slice 8 pippins into it, and add thereto some or­ange peel, sugar and 1-2 pint of port wine; pour in the batter, cream, bread and eggs and lay a puff paste over the dish and bake it 1-2 hour.
West Indian Pudding.—One pint of cream, 1-4 pound of loaf sugar, 1-2 pound of Savoy or sponge cakes, 8 eggs, 3 ounces pre­served green ginger; crumble up the cakes, put them into a basin and pour over them the cream, which should be previously sweetened and brought to the boiling point; cover the basin well, beat the eggs, and when the cream is soaked up stir them in. Butter a mould, arrange the ginger around it, pour in the pudding carefully and tie it down with a cloth, steam or boil it slowly for 1-2 hour and serve with the syrup from the ginger, which should be warmed, and pour over the pudding. Boil 1-2 hour. Sufficient for 5 or 6 persons. Seasonable at all times.
Aunt Susan's Cup Pudding.—Put 3 pints of milk on the stove to scald, then stir into another cupful of milk 6 good teaspoonfuls of flour and stir slowly and carefully into the boiling milk; stir until it boils well, adding a little salt. Wet cups *in cold water and pour in the mixture and let it cool. When cold serve with sweetened cream flavored to taste.
Jelly Pudding.—(J. M.)—Five large tablespoonfuls of any kind of Jelly 3 eggs beaten up with the jelly, 1 heaping tablespoonful of butter, sugar and spices, nutmeg, mace and cinnamoa.
Charleston Pudding.—Four cups of flour sifted with 1 teaspoon-ful of soda and 2 of cream tartar; beat 6 eggs with 3 cups of sugar till smooth, 1 cup of butter and 1 of cream in them; gently stir in the flour.
Cheese Pudding.—(Mrs. B.)—Mix together 1-2 pound grated cheese, 4 well beaten eggs, 1-2 pint of milk: mix well, season with a little salt and bake in a buttered dish, putting some slices of toast­ed brtad in the bottom of the dish or not, as you prefer.
Queen of all Pudding.—Beat well together 1 quart of new milk, 1 pint of bread crumbs, 1 teacup of fine white sugar, the yolks of four eggs, flavor with vanilla, put into a baking dish, set in the stove; when baked spread on the top one layer of preserves