The Complete Fairy Tales & Other Stories
By Hans Christian Andersen - online book

Oxford Complete Illustrated Edition all his stories written between 1835 and 1872.

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THE JUMPER                             331
all the same. Let her have the goose-bone with its lump of wax and bit of stick. I jumped the highest; but in this world a body is required if one wishes to be seen.'
And the Flea went into foreign military service, where it is said he was killed.
The Grasshopper seated himself out in the ditch, and thought and considered how things happened in the world. And he too said, ' Body is required ! body is required ! ' And then he sang his own melancholy song, and from that we have gathered this story, which they say is not true, though it 's in print.
THE SHEPHERDESS AND THE CHIMNEY-SWEEPER
Have you ever seen a very old wooden cupboard, quite black with age, and ornamented with carved foliage and arabesques ? Just such a cupboard stood in a parlour : it had been a legacy from the great-grandmother, and was covered from top to bottom with carved roses and tulips. There were the quaintest flourishes upon it, and from among these peered forth little stags' heads with antlers. In the middle of the cupboard door an entire figure of a man had been cut out: he was certainly ridiculous to look at, and he grinned, for you could not call it laughing : he had goat's legs, little horns on his head, and a long beard. The children in the room always called him the Billygoat-legs-Lieutenant-and -Major - General-War - Commander - Ser­geant ; that was a difficult name to pronounce, and there are not many who obtain this title ; but it was something to have cut him out. And there he was ! He was always looking at the table under the mirror, for on this table stood a lovely little Shepherdess made of china. Her shoes were gilt, her dress was neatly caught up with a red rose, and besides this she had a golden hat and a shepherd's crook : she was very lovely. Close by her stood a little Chimney-Sweeper, black as a coal, but also made of porcelain: he was as clean and neat as any other man, for it was only make-believe that he was a sweep ; the china-workers