The Complete Fairy Tales & Other Stories
By Hans Christian Andersen - online book

Oxford Complete Illustrated Edition all his stories written between 1835 and 1872.

Home Main Menu Order Support About Search



Share page  


Previous Contents Next

1036 '                GREAT-GRANDFATHER
country that these powers of Natuie were first understood and made known.'
Yes,' said Great-grandfather, and kissed me. ' Yes, and I have looked into the two mild eyes which first saw and understood this power of Nature ; they were childish eyes, like yours ! and I have shaken hands with him ! ' And he kissed me again.
More than a month had gone, when we had a letter from Frederick with the news that he was engaged to a charming young girl, whom the whole family would assuredly be delighted with. Her photograph was sent, and was examined with the naked eye and with a magnifying glass, for that is the charm of these pictures, that they can stand examination with the sharpest glass, and that the likeness becomes even clearer in that way. No painter has ever been capable of that, not even the greatest of the old times.
' If one had only known the discovery in those times,' said Great-grandfather, ' we should have been able to see the world's great men and benefactors face to face. How good and sweet this young girl looks,' he said, and gazed through the glass ; ' I shall know her now when she comes in at the door.'
But it was very near not happening : fortunately we at home scarcely knew of the danger until it was past.
The young newly-married couple arrived in England in joy and good health ; from there they proceeded with the steamer to Copenhagen. They saw the Danish coast, the white sand-hills of Jutland : then a great storm arose, and the ship grounded on one of the sand-banks and stuck fast. The sea rose high and seemed as if it would wreck the ship ; no lifeboat could work. The night came, but in the middle of the darkness a rocket was thrown from the shore over the stranded ship. The rocket carried a rope over it, a connexion was made between those out there and those on the shore, and soon a beautiful young lady was drawn through the heavy rolling waves in a cradle, and glad and happy was she when her young husband stood by her side on dry land. All on board were saved, and it was not daylight yet.
We lay sleeping soundly in Copenhagen, thinking neither