Anne of Green Gables - online book

The first Story in the Series with Anne Shirley at age 11 to 16

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16                ANNE OF GREEN GABLES
don't you think ? You could imagine you were dwell­ing in marble halls, couldn't you? And I was quite sure you would come for me in the morning, if you didn't to-night"
Matthew had taken the scrawny little hand awk­wardly in his; then and there he decided what to do. He could not tell this child with the glowing eyes that there had been a mistake; he would take her home and let Marilla do that She couldn't be left at Bright River anyhow, no matter what mistake had been made, so all questions and explanations might as well be deferred until he was safely back at Green Gables.
"I'm sorry I was late," he said shyly. "Come along. The horse is over in the yard. Give me your bag.''
"Oh, I can carry it," the child responded cheer­fully. "It isn't heavy. I've got all my worldly goods in it, but it isn't heavy. And if it isn't carried in just a certain way the handle pulls out—so I'd better keep it because I know the exact knack of it It's an extremely old carpet-bag. Oh, I'm very glad you've come, even if it would have been nice to sleep in a wild cherry-tree. We've got to drive a long piece, haven't we? Mrs. Spencer said it was eight miles. I'm glad because I love driving. Oh, it seems so wonderful that I'm going to live with you and belong to you. I've never belonged to anybody— not really. But the asylum was the worst. I've only been in it four months, but that was enough. I don't suppose you ever were an orphan in an asylum, so you can't, possibly understand what it is like. It's
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