Anne of Green Gables - online book

The first Story in the Series with Anne Shirley at age 11 to 16

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20                ANNE OF GREEN GABLES
stop when I make up my mind to it, although it's difficult."
Matthew, much to his own surprise, was enjoying himself. Like most quiet folks he liked talkative people when they were willing to do the talking them­selves and did not expect him to keep up his end of it. But he had never expected to enjoy the society of a little girl. Women were bad enough in all con­science, but little girls were worse. He detested the way they had of sidling past him timidly, with side-wise glances, as if they expected him to gobble them up at a mouthful if they ventured to say a word. This was the Avonlea type of well-bred little girl. But this freckled witch was very different, and although he found it rather difficult for his slower intelligence to keep up with her brisk mental proc­esses he thought that he "kind of liked her chatter." So he said as shyly as usual:
"Oh, you' can talk as much as you like. I don't mind."
"Oh, I'm so glad. I know you and I are going to get along together fine. It's such a relief to talk when one wants to and not be told that children should be seen and not heard. I've had that said to me a million times if I have once. And people laugh at me because I use big words. But if you have big ideas you have to use big words to express them, haven't you ?"
"Well now, that seems reasonable," said Matthew.
"Mrs. Spencer said that my tongue must be hung in the middle. But it isn't—it's firmly fastened at one end. Mrs. Spencer said your place was named
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