Anne of Green Gables - online book

The first Story in the Series with Anne Shirley at age 11 to 16

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60                ANNE OF GREEN GABLES
that, if she denied the appeal of that look, it would haunt her to her dying day. Moreover, she did not fancy Mrs. Blewett To hand a sensitive, "high-strung" child over to such a woman! No, she could not take the responsibility of doing that!
"Well, I don't know," she said slowly. "I didn't say that Matthew and I had absolutely decided that we wouldn't keep her. In fact, I may say that Mat­thew is disposed to keep her. I just came over to find out how the mistake had occurred. I think I'd better take her home again and talk it over with Matthew. I feel that I oughtn't to decide on anything without consulting him. If we make up our mind not to keep her we'll bring or send her over to you to-mor­row night If we don't you may know that she is going to stay with us. Will that suit you, Mrs. Blewett ?"
"I suppose it'll have to," said Mrs. Blewett un­graciously.
During Manila's speech a sunrise had been dawn­ing on Anne's face. First the look of despair faded out; then came a faint flush of hope; her eyes grew deep and bright as morning stars. The child was quite transfigured; and, a moment later, when Mrs. Spencer and Mrs. Blewett went out in quest of a recipe the latter had come to borrow, she sprang up and flew across the room to Marilla.
"Oh, Miss Cuthbert, did you really say that per­haps you would let me stay at Green Gables?" she said, in a breathless whisper, as if speaking aloud might shatter the glorious possibility. "Did you really say it? Or did I only imagine that you did?.'*
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