Anne of Green Gables - online book

The first Story in the Series with Anne Shirley at age 11 to 16

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102 ANNE OF GREEN GABLES
prayed for one, but I didn't much expect it on that account. I didn't suppose God would have time to bother about a little orphan girl's dress. I knew I'd just have to depend on Marilla for it. Well, fortu­nately I can imagine that one of them is of snow-white muslin with lovely lace frills and three-puffed sleeves."
The next morning warnings of a sick headache pre­vented Marilla from going to Sunday-school with Anne.
"You'll have to go down and call for Airs. Lynde, Anne," she said. "She'll see that you get into the right class. Now, mind you behave yourself prop­erly. Stay to preaching afterwards and ask Mrs. Lynde to show you our pew. Here's a cent for col­lection. Don't stare at people and don't fidget. I shall expect you to tell me the text when you come home."
Anne started off irreproachably, arrayed in the stiff black-and-white sateen, which, while decent as regards length and certainly not open to the charge of skimpiness, contrived to emphasize every cornef and angle of her thin figure. Her hat was a little, flat, glossy, new sailor, the extreme plainness of which had likewise much disappointed Anne, who had permitted herself secret visions of ribbon and flowers. The latter, however, were supplied before Anne reached the main road, for, being confronted half-way down the lane with a golden frenzy of wind-stirred buttercups and a glory of wild roses, Anne promptly and liberally garlanded her hat with a heavy wreath of them. .Whatever other people
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