Anne of Green Gables - online book

The first Story in the Series with Anne Shirley at age 11 to 16

Home Main Menu Order Support About Search



Share page  


Previous Contents Next

A SOLEMN VOW AND PROMISE 109
me! It would be the most tragical disappointment of my life."
"Now, don't get into a fluster. And I do wish you wouldn't use such long words. It sounds so funny in a little girl. I guess Diana'll like you well enough. It's her mother you've got to reckon with. If she doesn't like you it won't matter how much Diana does. If she has heard about your outburst to Mrs. Lynde and going to church with buttercups round your hat I don't know what she'll think of you. You must be polite and well-behaved, and don't make any of your startling speeches. For pity's sake, if the child isn't actually trembling!"
Anne was trembling. Her face was pale and tense.
"Oh, Marilla, you'd be excited, too, if you were going to meet a little girl you hoped to be your bosom friend and whose mother mightn't like you," she said as she hastened to get her hat
They went over to Orchard Slope by the short cut across the brook and up the firry hill grove. Mrs. Barry came to the kitchen door in answer to Manila's knock. She was a tall, black-eyed, black-haired woman, with a very resolute mouth. She had the reputation of being very strict with her children.
"How do you do, Marilla?" she said cordially. "Come in. And this is the little girl you have adopted, I suppose?"
"Yes, this is Anne Shirley," said Marilla.
"Spelled with an e," gasped Anne, who, tremulous and excited as she was, was determined there should be no misunderstanding on that important point.
Previous Contents Next