Anne of Green Gables - online book

The first Story in the Series with Anne Shirley at age 11 to 16

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124 ANNE OF GREEN GABLES
say anything more unless you are prepared to tell the whole truth. Go to your room and stay there until you are ready to confess."
"Will I take the peas with me ?" said Anne meekly.
"No, I'll finish shelling them myself. Do as I bid you."
When Anne had gone Marilla went about her eve­ning tasks in a very disturbed state of mind. She was worried about her valuable brooch. What if Anne had lost it? And how wicked of the child to deny having taken it, when anybody could see she must have! With Buch an innocent face, too!
"I don't know what I wouldn't sooner have had happen," thought Marilla, as she nervously shelled the peas. "Of course, I don't suppose she meant to steal it or anything like that. She's just taken it to play with or help along that imagination of hers. She must have taken it, that's clear, for there hasn't been a soul in that room since she was in it, by her own story, until I went up to-night. And the brooch is gone, there's nothing surer. I suppose she has lost it and is afraid to own up for fear she'll be punished. It's a dreadful thing to think she tells falsehoods. It's a far worse thing than her fit of temper. It's a fearful responsibility to have a child in your house you can't trust. Slyness and untruthfulness—that's what she has displayed. I declare I feel worse about that than about the brooch. If she'd only have told the truth about it I wouldn't mind so mueh."
Marilla went to her room at intervals all through the evening and searched for the brooch, without find­ing it. A bed-time visit to the east gable produced no
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