Anne of Green Gables - online book

The first Story in the Series with Anne Shirley at age 11 to 16

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150 ANNE OF GREEN GABLES
ing it; but she resolved wisely to say nothing more just then.
"I'll run down and see Rachel about it this eve­ning," she thought "There's no use reasoning with !Anne now. She's too worked up and I've an idea she can be awful stubborn if she takes the notion. [Far as I can make out from her story, Mr. Phillips has been carrying matters with a rather high hand. But it would never do to say so to her. I'll just talk it over with Rachel. She's sent ten children to school and she ought to know something about it She'll have heard the whole story, too, by this time."
Marilla found Mrs. Lynde knitting quilts as in­dustriously and cheerfully as usual.
"I suppose you know what I've come about," she said, a little shamefacedly.
Mrs. Rachel nodded.
"About Anne's fuss in school, I reckon," she said. "Tillie Boulter was in on her way home from school and told me about it."
"I don't know what to do with her," said Marilla. *'She declares she won't go back to school. I never saw a child so worked up. I've been expecting trouble ever since she started to school. I knew things were going too smooth to last. She's so high-strung. What would you advise, Rachel?"
"Well, since you've asked my advice, Marilla," said Mrs. Lynde amiably—Mrs. Lynde dearly loved to be asked for advice—"I'd just humour her a little at first, that's what I'd do. It's my belief that Mr. Phillips was in the wrong. Of course, it doesn't do to say so to the children, you know. And of
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