Anne of Green Gables - online book

The first Story in the Series with Anne Shirley at age 11 to 16

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CATASTROPHE AND CONFESSION 191
birthday in a year. It isn't as if birthdays were com­mon things, Marilla. Prissy Andrews is going to re­cite 'Curfew Must Not Ring To-night' That is such a good moral piece, Marilla, I'm sure it would do me lots of good to hear it. And the choir are going to sing four lovely pathetic songs that are pretty near as good as hymns. And oh, Marilla, the minister is go­ing to take part; yes, indeed, he is; he's going to give an address. That will be just about the same thing as a sermon. Please, mayn't I go, Marilla?"
"You heard what I said, Anne, didn't you? Take off your boots now and go to bed. It's past eight"
"There's just one more thing, Marilla," said Anne, with the air of producing the last shot in her locker. "Mrs. Barry told Diana that we might sleep in the spare-room bed. Think of the honour of your little Anne being put in the spare-room bed."
"It's an honour you'll have to get along without Go to bed, Anne, and don't let me hear another word out of you."
When Anne, with tears rolling over her cheeks, had gone sorrowfully up-stairs, Matthew, who had been apparently sound asleep on the lounge during the whole dialogue, opened his eyes and said decidedly:
"Well now, Marilla, I think you ought to let Anne
go-
"I don't then," retorted Marilla. "Who's bringing this child up, Matthew, you or me ?"
"Well now, you," admitted Matthew.
"Don't interfere then."
"Well now, I ain't interfering. It ain't interfering
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