Anne of Green Gables - online book

The first Story in the Series with Anne Shirley at age 11 to 16

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222 ANNE OF GREEN GABLES
"You'll be using the best tea-set, of course, Ma­nila," she said. "Can I fix up the table with ferns and wild roses ?"
"I think that's all nonsense," sniffed Marilla. "In my opinion it's the eatables that matter and not flum­mery decorations."
"Mrs. Barry had her table decorated," said Anne, who was not entirely guiltless of the wisdom of the serpent, "and the minister paid her an elegant com­pliment He said it was a feast for the eye as well as the palate."
"Well, do as you like," said Marilla, who was quite determined not to be surpassed by Mrs. Barry or anybody else. "Only mind you leave enough room for the dishes and the food."
Anne laid herself out to decorate in a manner and after a fashion that should leave Mrs. Barry's no­where. Having abundance of roses and ferns and a very artistic taste of her own, she made that tea-table such a thing of beauty that when the minister and his wife sat down to it they exclaimed in chorus over its loveliness.
"It's Anne's doings," said Marilla, grimly just; and Anne felt that Mrs. Allan's approving smile was almost too much happiness for this world.
Matthew was there, having been inveigled into the party only goodness and Anne knew how. He had been in such a state of shyness and nervousness that Marilla had given him up in despair, but Anne took him in hand so successfully that he now sat at the table in his best clothes and white collar and talked to the minister not uninterestingly. He never said a
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