Anne of Green Gables - online book

The first Story in the Series with Anne Shirley at age 11 to 16

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THE WINTER AT QUEEN'S
367
pended on them—as the girls truly thought theirs did—you could not regard them philosophically.
"I've lost seven pounds in the last two weeks," sighed Jane. "It's no use to say don't worry. I will worry. Worrying helps you some—it seems as if you were doing something when you re worrying. It would be dreadful if I failed to get my license after going to Queen's all winter and spending so much money."
"I don't care," said Josie Pye. "If I don't pass this year I'm coming back next. My father can af­ford to send me. Anne, Frank Stockley says that Professor Tremaine said Gilbert Blythe was sure to get the medal and that Emily Clay would likely win the Avery scholarship."
"That may make me feel badly to-morrow, Josie," laughed Anne, "but just now I honestly feel that as long as I know the violets are coming out all purple down in the hollow below Green Gables and that little ferns are poking their heads up in Lovers' Lane, it's not a great deal of difference whether I win the Avery or not. I've done my best and I begin to understand what is meant by the 'joy of the strife.' Next to trying and winning, the best thing is trying and failing. Girls, don't talk about exams! Look at that arch of pale green sky over those houses and picture to yourselves what it must look like over the purply-dark beechwoods back of Avonlea."
"What are you going to wear for commencement, Jane?" asked Ruby practically.
Jane and Josie both answered at once and the
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