Anne of Green Gables - online book

The first Story in the Series with Anne Shirley at age 11 to 16

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380 ANNE OF GREEN GABLES
who had walked with her last evening at sunset and was now lying in the dim room below with that awful peace on his brow. But no tears came at first, even when she knelt by her window in the darkness and prayed, looking up to the stars beyond the hills—no tears, only the same horrible dull ache of misery that kept on aching until she fell asleep, worn out with the day's pain and excitement.
In the night she awakened, with the stillness and the darkness about her, and the recollection of the day came over her like a wave of sorrow. She could see Matthew's face smiling at her as he had smiled when they parted at the gate that last eve­ning—she could hear his voice saying, "My girl— my girl that I'm proud of." Then the tears came and Anne wept her heart out. Manila heard, her and crept in to comfort her.
"There—there—don't cry so, dearie. It can't bring him back. It—it—isn't right to cry so. I knew that to-day, but I couldn't help it then. He'd always been such a good, kind brother to me—but God knows best."
"Oh, just let me cry, Manila," sobbed Anne. "The tears don't hurt me like that ache did. Stay here for a little while with me and keep your arm round me—so. I couldn't have Diana stay, she's good and kind and sweet—but it's not her sorrow— she's outside of it and she couldn't come close enough to my heart to help me. It's our sorrow— yours and mine. Oh, Marilla, what will we do without him?"
"We've got each other, Anne. I don't know
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