Anne of Green Gables - online book

The first Story in the Series with Anne Shirley at age 11 to 16

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804             ANNE OF GREEN GABLES
"There's a good deal of the child about her yet in some ways."
"There's a good deal more of the woman about her in others," retorted Marilla, with a momentary return of her old crispness.
But crispness was no longer Manila's distinguish­ing characteristic As Mrs. Lynde told her Thomas that night,
"Marilla Cuthbert has got mellow. That's what."
Anne went to the little Avonlea graveyard the next evening to put fresh flowers on Matthew's grave and water the Scotch rose-bush. She lingered there until dusk, liking the peace and calm of the little place, with its poplars whose rustle was like low, friendly speech, and its whispering grasses growing at will among the graves. When she fi­nally left it and walked down the long hill that sloped to the Lake of Shining Waters it was past sunset and all Avonlea lay before her in a dreamlike afterlight—"a haunt of ancient peace." There was a freshness in the air as of a wind that had blown over honey-sweet fields of clover. Home lights twinkled out here and there among the homestead trees. Beyond lay the sea, misty and purple, with its haunting, unceasing murmur. The west was a glory of soft mingled hues, and the pond reflected them all in still softer shadings. The beauty of it all thrilled Anne's heart, and she gratefully opened the gates of her soul to it.
"Dear old world," she murmured, "you are very lovely, and I am glad to be alive in you."
Half-way down the hill a tall lad came whistling
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