The Arabian Nights Entertainments - online book

Children's Classic Fairy Tales From The East, Edited By Andrew Lang

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28
THE ARABIAN NIGHTS
Then the genius began to change himself into smoke, which, as before, spread over the sea and the shore, and which, then collecting itself together, began to go back into the vase slowly and evenly till there was nothing left outside. Then a voice came from the vase which said to the fisherman, 'Well, unbelieving fisherman, here I am in the vase ; do you believe me now? '
The fisherman instead of answering took the lid of lead and shut it down quickly on the vase.
' Now, O genius,' he cried, ' ask pardon of me, and choose by what death you will die ! But no, it will be better if I throw you in the sea whence I drew you out, and I will build a house on the shore to warn fishermen who come to cast their nets here, against fishing up such a wicked genius as you are, who vows to kill the man who frees you.'
At these words the genius did all he could to get out, but he could not, because of the enchantment on the lid.
Then he tried to get out by cunning.
' If you will take off the cover,' he said, ' I will repay you.'
' No,'answered the fisherman, ' if I trust myself to you I am afraid you will treat me as a certain Greek king treated the physican Douban. Listen, and I will tell you'
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