The Arabian Nights Entertainments - online book

Children's Classic Fairy Tales From The East, Edited By Andrew Lang

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STORY OF THE THIRD CALENDER 121
wandered on till I came to a hall, which I knew to have been the one from which the roc had taken me, by the ten blue sofas against the wall.
The ten young men were not present when I first entered, but came in soon after, accompanied by the old man. They greeted me kindly, and bewailed my mis­fortune, though, indeed, they had expected nothing less. ' All that has happened to you,' they said, ' we also have undergone, and we should be enjoying the same happi­ness still, had we not opened the Golden Door while the princesses were absent. You have been no wiser than we, and have suffered the same punishment. We would gladly receive you among us, to perform such penance as we do, but we have already told you that this is impos­sible. Depart, therefore, from hence and go to the Court of Bagdad, where you shall meet with him that can decide your destiny.' They told me the way I was to travel, and I left them.
On the road I caused my beard and eyebrows to too shaved, and put on a Calender's habit. I have had a long journey, but arrived this evening in the city, where I met my brother Calenders at the gate, being strangers like myself. We wondered much at one another, to see we were all blind of the same eye, but we had no leisure to discourse at length of our common calamities. We had only so much time as to come hither to implore those favours which you have been generously pleased to grant us.
He finished, and it was Zobeida's turn to speak: < Go wherever you please,' she said, addressing all three. 'I pardon you all, but you must depart immediately out of this house.'
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