The Arabian Nights Entertainments - online book

Children's Classic Fairy Tales From The East, Edited By Andrew Lang

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226               THE ARABIAN NIGHTS
my soul!' he exclaimed, as he kissed her forehead, her eyes and mouth in a way which would certainly have roused her had not the genie's enchantments kept her asleep.
' How, fair lady!' he cried, ' you do not wake at the signs of Camaralzaman's love? Be you who you may, he is not unworthy of you.'
It then suddenly occurred to him, that perhaps this was the bride his father had destined for him, and that the King had probably had her placed in this room in order to see how far Camaralzaman's aversion to marriage would withstand her charms.
' At all events,' he thought, ' I will take this ring as a remembrance of her.'
So saying he drew off a fine ring which the princess wore on her finger, and replaced it by one of his own. After which he lay down again and was soon fast asleep.
Then Danhasch, in his turn, took the form of a gnat and bit the princess on her lip.
She started up, and was not a little amazed at seeing a young man beside her. From surprise she soon passed to admiration, and then to delight on perceiving how handsome and fascinating he was.
' Why,' cried she, ' was it you my father wished me to marry? How unlucky that I did not know sooner! I should not have made him so angry. But wake up! wake up! for I know I shall love you with all my heart.'
So saying she shook Camaralzaman so violently that nothing but the spells of Maimoune could have prevented his waking.
' Oh!' cried the princess. ' Why are you so drowsy?' So saying she took his hand and noticed her own ring on his finger, which made her wonder still more. But as he still remained in a profound slumber she pressed a kiss on his cheek and soon fell fast asleep too.
Then Maimoune turning to the genie said: ' Well,
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