The Arabian Nights Entertainments - online book

Children's Classic Fairy Tales From The East, Edited By Andrew Lang

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362               THE ARABIAN NIGHTS
cities. You have only to choose which you would prefer, to become its ruler to the end of your life.'
' Sire,' answered the Indian, to whom the proposal did not seem nearly so generous as it appeared to the king, ' I am most grateful to your Highness for your princely offer, and beseech you not to be offended with me if I say that I can only deliver up my horse in exchange for the hand of the princess your daughter.'
A shout of laughter burst from the courtiers as they heard these words, and Prince Firouz Schah, the heir apparent, was filled with anger at the Indian's presumption. The king, however, thought that it would not cost him much to part from the princess in order to gain such a delightful toy, and while he was hesitating as to his answer the prince broke in.
' Sire,' he said, 'it is not possible that you can doubt for an instant what reply you should give to such an inso­lent bargain. Consider what you owe to yourself, and to the blood of your ancestors.'
' My son,' replied the king, ' you speak nobly, but you do not realise either the value of the horse, or the fact that if I reject the proposal of the Indian, he will only make the same to some other monarch, and I should be filled with despair at the thought that anyone but myself should own this Seventh Wonder of the World. Of course I do not say that I shall accept his conditions, and perhaps he may be brought to reason, but meanwhile I should like you to examine the horse, and, with the owner's permission, to make trial of its powers.'
The Indian, who had overheard the king's speech, thought that he saw in it signs of yielding to his proposal, so he joyfully agreed to the monarch's wishes, and came forward to help the prince to mount the horse, and show him how to guide it: but, before he had finished, the young man turned the screw, and was soon out of sight.
They waited some time, expecting that every moment he might be seen returning in the distance, but at length
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