BLACK BEAUTY - online book

The Autobiography Of A Horse, With Fifty Illustrations.

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JAMES HOWARD.
59
was almost frightened, he roared and bellowed in such a style. The boys rushed in from the playground, and the master ran in from the road to see who was being mur­dered. Of course, I said fair and square at once what I had done, and why; then I showed the master the flies, some crushed and some crawling about helpless, and I showed him the wings on the window-sill. I never saw him so angry before; but as Bill was still howling and whining, like the coward that he was, he did not give him any more punishment of that kind, but set him up on a stool for the rest of the afternoon, and said that he should not go out to play for that week. Then he talked to all the boys very seriously about cruelty, and said how hard­hearted and cowardly it was to hurt the weak and the helpless; but what stuck in my mind was this: he said that cruelty ivas the DeviVs own trade-mark, and if we saw any­one who took pleasure in cruelty we might know who he belonged to, for the Devil was a murderer from the be­ginning, and a tormentor to the end. On the other hand, where we saw people who loved their neighbors, and were kind to man and beast, we might know that was God's mark, for ' God is Love.'"
" Your master never taught you a truer thing," said John ; " there is no religion without love, and people may talk as much as they like about their religion, but if it does not teach them to be good and kind to man and beast it is all a sham—all a sham, James, and it won't stand when things come to be turned inside out, and put down for what they are."
CHAPTER XIV.
JAMES HOWARD.
One morning early in December John had just led me into my box after my daily exercise, and was strapping
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