BLACK BEAUTY - online book

The Autobiography Of A Horse, With Fifty Illustrations.

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CHAPTER XXIII.
A STRIKE FOR LIBERTY.
One day my lady came down later than usual, and the silk rustled more than ever.
" Drive to the Duchess of B-----'s," she said ; and then,
after a pause, " Are you never going to get those horses' heads up, York? Raise them at once, and let us have no more of this humoring and nonsense."
York came to me first, while the groom stood at Ginger's head. He drew my head hack and fixed the rein so tight that it was almost intolerable; then he went to Ginger, who was impatiently jerking her head up and down against the bit, as was her way now. She had a good idea of what was coming, and the moment York took the rein off the terret in order to shorten it she took her opportunity, and reared up so suddenly that York had his nose roughly hit and his hat knocked off; the groom was nearly thrown off his legs. At once they both flew to her head, but she was a match for them, and went on plunging, rearing, and kick­ing in a most desperate manner ; at last she kicked right over the carriage-pole and fell down, after giving me a severe blow on my near quarter. There is no knowing what further mischief she might have done had not York promptly sat himself down flat on her head to prevent her struggling, at the same time calling out, " Unbuckle the black horse! Run for the winch and unscrew the car­riage-pole ! Cut the trace here, somebody, if you can't unhitch it!" One of the footmen ran for the winch, and another brought a knife from the house. The groom soon
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