BLACK BEAUTY - online book

The Autobiography Of A Horse, With Fifty Illustrations.

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POLLY AND A REAL GENTLEMAN.                 155
meadow out of sheer spirits at being free; and I did all by turns. Jerry seemed to be quite as happy as I was: he sat down by a bank under a shady tree, and listened to the birds, then he sang himself, and read out of the lit­tle brown book he is so fond of, then wandered round the meadow and down by a little brook, where he picked the flowers and the hawthorn, and tied them up with long sprays of ivy; then he gave me a good feed of the oats which he had brought with him; but the time seemed all too short—I had not been in a field since I left poor Gin­ger at Earlshall.
We came home gently, and Jerry's first words were, as we came into the yard, " Well, Polly, I have not lost my Sunday after all, for the birds were singing hymns in every bush, and I joined in the service; and as for Jack, he was like a young colt."
When he handed Dolly the flowers, she jumped about for joy.
CHAPTER XXXVIII.
DOLLY AND A REAL GENTLEMAN.
The winter came in early, with a great deal of cold and wet. There was snow, or sleet, or rain, almost every day for weeks, changing only for keen driving winds or sharp frosts. The horses all felt it very much. When it is a dry cold, a couple of good thick rugs will keep the warmth in us ; but when it is soaking rain, they soon get wet through and are no good. Some of the drivers had a waterproof cover to throw over, which was a fine thing; but some of the men were so poor that they could not pro­tect either themselves or their horses, and many of them
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