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The Autobiography Of A Horse, With Fifty Illustrations.

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188                              BLA CK BE A UTY.
me my head; but the heavy loads went on. Good feed and fair rest will keep up one's strength under full work; but no horse can stand against overloading, and I was get­ting so thoroughly pulled down from this cause that a younger horse was bought in my place. I may as well mention here what I suffered at this time from another cause. I had heard horses speak of it, but had never myself had experience of the evil; this was a badly-lighted stable; there was only one very small window at the end, and the consequence was that the stalls were almost dark.
Besides the depressing effect this had on my spirits, it very much weakened my sight, and when I was suddenly brought out of the darkness into the glare of daylight it was very painful to my eyes. Several times I stumbled over the threshold, and could scarcely see where I was going. ^
I believe, had I stayed there very long, I should have become purblind, and that would have been a great misfortune, for I have heard men say that a stone-blind horse was safer to drive than one which had imperfect sight, as it gene­rally makes them very timid. However, I escaped with­out any permanent injury to my sight, and was sold to a large cab owner.
CHAPTER XLVII.
HARD TIMES.
I shall never forget my new master; he had "black eyes and a hooked nose, his mouth was as full of teeth as a bull-dog's, and his voice was as harsh as the grinding of cart wheels over gravel stones. His name was Nicholas Skinner, and I believe he was the same man that poor Seedy Sam drove for.
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