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MAN THE SUBJECT OF EDUCATION.            43
even gentle and good feelings are prone to ex­cess, still, the principles of virtue are capable of being established in the heart. By being cherished, they become strong; by being founded in reason, they become fixed pillars, supporting the beautiful edifice of a consistent and just moral character—incomparably the most glori­ous spectacle to be seen on this earth. And let it be remembered, that as indulgence and exer­cise give activity and vigor to bad passions, so, on the contrary, if permitted to sleep, they be­come feeble and reluctant to rise into exertion. As the arm of a man tied up in a sling gradually loses strength and becomes averse to motion, so any human passion, laid long to rest, wakes with difficulty and acts with enfeebled vigor.
MAN DISTINGUISHED FROM ALL OTHER LIVING THINGS AS THE SUBJECT OP EDUCATION.
Our slight survey of the progress of man from infancy to maturity, shows that in the develop­ment of his physical, mental, and moral facul­ties, he is wholly dependent upon education. A comparison of man with other animated beings shows that while he comes into existence with every thing to learn, they are endowed with an
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