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MORALS.
179
instincts, feelings, and affections, which have a reference to his improvement in virtue, and which excite him to promote the happiness of others. Those powers and active principles. like the intellectual, are susceptible of vast im­provement, by attention, by exercise, by trials and difficulties, and by an expansion of the intellectual views. Such are filial and fraternal affection, fortitude, temperance, justice, grati­tude, generosity, love of friends and country, philanthropy, and general benevolence. Dege­nerate as our world has always been, many striking examples of such virtues have been displayed both in ancient and modern times, which demonstrate the vigor, expansion, and sublimity of the moral powers of man.
" When we behold men animated by noble sentiments, exhibiting sublime virtues, and per­forming illustrious actions.—displaying gene­rosity and beneficence in seasons of calamity, and tranquillity and fortitude in the midst of difficulties and dangers—desiring riches only for the sake of distributing them—estimating places of power and honor only for the sake of sup­pressing vice, rewarding virtue, and promot­ing the prosperity of their country—enduring poverty and distress with a noble heroism—suf­fering injuries and affronts with patience and
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