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182
FIRESIDE EDUCATION.
pursuit of whatever he thought just, and inca­pable of the least falsehood, or shadow of flat­tery, disguise, or fraud, even in jest. He had such a control over his passions, that he uni­formly sacrificed his private interests and his private resentments to the good of the public. Themistocles was one of the principal actors who procured his banishment from Athens: but, after being recalled, he assisted him on every occasion with his advice and credit, joyfully-taking pains to promote the glory of his greatest enemy through the motive of advancing the public good. And when, afterwards, the dis­grace of Themistocles gave him a proper oppor­tunity for revenge, instead of resenting the ill-treatment he had received from him, he con­stantly refused to join with his enemies, being as far from secretly rejoicing over the misfortune of his adversary, as he had been before from being afflicted at his good success. Such vir­tues reflect a dignity and grandeur on every mind in which they reside, which appear incom­patible with the idea that it is destined to retire forever from the scene of action at the hour of death.
" But the noblest examples of exalted virtue are to be found among those who have enlisted themselves in the cause of Christianity. The
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