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MORALh.
191
from the gentlemen of his bedchamber, that he had no peace or quiet in himself, but always carried it as if some eminent danger was near him. His eyes were always whirling about on this side, and on that side: he wore a shirt of mail, and was always laying his hand upon his dagger, looking as furiously as if he was ready to strike. He had no quiet in his mind by day, nor could take any rest by night, but, molested with terrifying dreams, would start out of his bed, and run like a distracted man about the chamber.
" This state of mind, in reference to another case, is admirably described in the following lines of Dryden.
' Amidst your train tins unseen judge will wait, Examine how you came by all your state, Upbraid your impious pomp, and in your ear Will hollow, rebel! traitor! murderer! Your ill-got power wan looks and care shall bring. Known but by discontent to be a king. Of crowds afraid, yet anxious when alone, You '11 sit and brood your sorrows on a throne '
" Bessus, the Paeonian, being reproached with ill-nature for pulling down a nest of young spar­rows and killing them, answered, that he had reason so to do, ' because these little birds never ceased falsely to accuse him of the murder of his father.' This parricide had been till then
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