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MORALS.
213
then, what I have no doubt of, each individual of this number to be in a state of positive en­joyment; what a sum, collectively, of gratifica­tion and pleasure have we here before our view!
'' The young of all animals appear to me to receive pleasure simply from the exercise of their limbs and bodily faculties, without refe­rence to any end to be attained, or any use to be answered by the exertion. A child, without knowing any thing of the use of language, is in a high degree delighted with being able to speak. Its incessant repetition of a few articulate sounds, or, perhaps, of the single word which it has learnt to pronounce, proves this point clearly. Nor is it less pleased with its first successful endeavors to walk, or rather to run, which precedes walking, although entirely igno­rant of the importance of the attainment to its future life, and even without applying it to any present purpose. A child is delighted with speaking, without having any thing to say; and with walking, without knowing where to go. And prior to both these, I am disposed to believe that the waking hours of infancy are agreeably taken up with the exercise of vision, or perhaps, more properly speaking, with learn­ing to see.
" But it is not for youth alone that the great
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