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MORALS.
215
It is therefore a great virtue, and may be used as a decisive test of character. lie who has it is entitled to confidence and respect; he who lack's it merits contempt. It' a man carefully performs his promises, may we not confide in him.' If he violates them, must we not des­pise him .' If we find a person is true to friend­ship, we may be sure that he has just percep­tions of virtue. If we find one who betrays a friend, or who is guilty of any species of treache­ry, we cannot doubt that lie is essentially base and corrupt. To those who cannot keep a se­cret, we commend an anecdote of Charles IT. of England, which ought to engraved upon the heart of every man. When importuned to com­municate something of a private nature, the subtle monarch said. -'Can you keep a secrel ?" "Most faithfully," returned the nobleman. '' So can I." was the laconic and severe answer of the king. J ,et parents, who desire that their children should possess the respect of the community and enjoy the pleasures of friendship, take care to imbue them with fidelity of character.
PRUDENCE.
11 Aristotle is praised for naming fortitude, the first of the cardinal virtues, as that without which no other virtue can steadily be practised j
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