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MORALS.
225
blubber oil for food, and an ice cabin for habi­tation, above all the refinements of other coun­tries.
Such are some of the exhibitions of this uni­versal sentiment in less refined nations. In a state of higher civilization, it becomes a more exalted passion, and is thus beautifully ex­pressed by Scott: —
" Breathes there the man, with soul so dead. Who never to himself hath said,
This is my own, my native land ! Whose heart hath ne'er witlun him burned, As home his footsteps he hath turned.
From wand'ring on a foreign strand? If such there he, go, mark him well; For him no minstrel raptures swell ; High though his titles, proud his name, Boundless his wealth as wish can claim; Despite these titles, power and pelf, The wretch, concentred all in self, Living, shall forfeit lair renown, And, doubly dying, shall '40 down To the vile dust, from whence he sprung, Unwept, unhonored and unsung."
It might at first seem that patriotism, which implies a preference of one country over another, was opposed to philanthropy, which embraces in its generous scope the whole human family. But a consideration of the practical effect of patriotism will lead us not merely to dismiss all distrust, but to admire that dispensation of pro-
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