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How Best To Educate Your Child At Home

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324
FIRESIDE EDUCATION.
tion of life? Is it not short-sighted to commit children, as is the case in many parts of the country, to the care of persons who take up the vocation of teachers as a casual employ­ment, and who are alike destitute of experience and special preparation for the task? Even the tiller of the soil must be instructed in his art, —should not the cultivator of the intellect and the heart be instructed in his ?
It may be true, as is often said, that'any body can keep a school'5 but to keep a good one re­quires natural talents and special preparation. There is a great deal about the governing and teaching of children that is as truly technical as the disciplining an army or conducting a campaign. Whoever has been in the habit of visiting schools must have seen a prodigious difference between them. Some are well and some are ill governed. In some, the children are well instructed; in others, more than half the scholars are rather injured that benefited. And why is this difference? Plainly because one understands his vocation and another does not. One has learnt how difficulties are to be overcome, and how success is to be obtained in governing children, and in developing their va­rious faculties; while the other is uninstructed in these arts.
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