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How Best To Educate Your Child At Home

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330
FIRESIDE EDUCATION.
his ambition. It would be a good thing for every school district in the country to have a snug little mansion, and an acre or two of ground with a good garden, for the occupancy of the schoolmaster. If any person has super­fluous cash, he might well bestow a portion of it in building such tenements for teachers of common schools.
It may be well to suggest that mere scholar­ship does not qualify a man to be a teacher. A person may have a great deal of knowledge, and yet have a bungling way of communicating it to others. Nor should personal qualities be wholly overlooked. A teacher of children should have a bland countenance. He should have a warm heart, pouring out habitual sunshine through his face and demeanor. He should have no awkwardness of manner, no obliquity of temper, no disagreeable peculiarities which excite ridicule, and no weaknesses which beget a sneer. Children are keen observers in gene­ral, and every school has some special Paul Pry, who will sift the character of the teacher, and show to every body the particles of which it is composed. If, therefore, a teacher would preserve his authority, he must secure the re­spect of the school, and this cannot be done if there is any thing about him to excite contempt.
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