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MANNERS.
371
fragments and put them into his mouth with his knife. But these arc interdicted, and no emer­gency of appetite, in either case, can excuse a breach of the law.
The mode in which the manners of the re­fined arc caught by those who are subjected to their influence, is easily explained. If we see a certain thing practised by one who occupies a high rank in society, it becomes associated with that individual, and. at last, partakes of the taste, respectability and refinement which we attri­bute to him. liven if the thing is insignificant in itself, it soon becomes, in our view, appropri­ate to a person of high breeding, and is thus commended to our imitation. If, on the con­trary, we see any thing done by a person who is coarse, rude and vulgar, it becomes in our minds associated with the individual, and the rude demeanor with which he is marked. Thus it is that certain manners become agreeable to us as proofs of good taste and good breeding, and others disgust us as being signs of obtru­sive selfishness, or of those evil communica­tions which are said to corrupt good manners.
It is not my present purpose to attempt to codify the laws of etiquette, or draw out at length the enacted statutes of the fashionable world. These attempts have been frequently
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