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How Best To Educate Your Child At Home

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MANNERS.
333
they may think proper ; remarking, by the way, that in this case, as in all others, practice alone can give full effect to precept. The words of Locke are worthy of special notice here :— '" Think not that children are to be taught pro­priety of conduct by loading their memory with rules, directing them how to act on every par­ticular occasion. Burden them not with rules, but impress them with habits."
Manners at table.—Avoid all display of greediness. It was formerly esteemed a matter of propriety for each individual to delay the commencement of his meal till all were helped: but as this introduces a stiff formality, and moreover causes the food to get cold before it is eaten, it is now considered proper lor a person to begin to eat as soon as he is helped. Avoid putting food into your mouth with your knife, and help yourself to salt only with the salt-spoon. Eat with the least possible noise of the lips and teeth. Never help yourself from any dish with your own knife and fork, but apply to the person who is near it, or who undertakes to distribute its contents. If you are called upon to help any person, never disgust him by overloading his plate. If you help to gravy, put it on the plate by itself, and do not pour it over the food. Do every thing with delibera-
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