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CONCLUSION.
395
or below the stirring breath of fortune, usually becomes the subject of ennui, despondency, or hypochondria; his bosom engendering '; vile thoughts and creeping miseries," as the depths of a stagnant lake become infested with rep­tiles of every form. It is he who is wrought into activity by the gentle force of changeful passions, whose breast is like the flowing wave, reflecting bright images on the surface, and holding fair forms within.
CONCLUSION.
"Is duty a mere spirt, or an employ? Lire an intrusted talent, or a toy )''
In coming to the close of this work, I cannot but feel an apprehension that these pages may fail of producing the good results I could desire. Enlightened parents have heard so much on the subject of education, that they may be weary of the subject, and therefore turn away with disgust. On the other hand, those who. like the untutored animals, regard their offspring with interest only so long as they require pro­tection and while the instincts of nature impel them to watch over them, will never be reached and roused from their insensibility by so humble a voice as mine. But I am still cheered by remarking the spirit of improvement that is abroad. The dreary clouds of a long dark age are drifting by, and the light of a better day is dawning through upon society. The recent shock in the commercial affairs of the world has checked mankind in the headlong pursuit of wealth, and called them to reflect whether it is wise to invest the whole interest of the immortal mind, in those goods, which so easily take to themselves wings and fly away. There is an ancient Greek story of several persons, who. in making a voyage on the Mediterranean, were cast away and thrown upon an
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