The Blue Fairy Book - online childrens book

Illustrated classic fairy tales for children by Andrew Lang

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18
PRINCE HYACINTH
anything about it. I will even try to think that you have an ordinary nose. To tell the truth, it would make three reasonable ones.'
The Prince, who was no longer hungry, grew so impatient at the Fairy's continual remarks about his nose that at last he threw him­self upon his horse and rode hastily away. But wherever he came in his journeyings he thought the people were mad, for they all talked of his nose, and yet he could not bring himself to admit that it was too long, he had been so used all his life to hear it called handsome.
The old Fairy, who washed to make him happy, at last hit upon a plan. She shut the Dear Little Princess up in a palace of crystal, and put this palace down where the Prince could not fail to find it. His joy at seeing the Princess again was extreme, and he set to work with all his might to try to break her prison; but in spite of all his efforts he failed utterly. In despair he thought at least that he would try to get near enough to speak to the Dear Little Princess, who, on her part, stretched out her hand that he might kiss it; but turn which way he might, he never could raise it to his lips, for his long nose always prevented it. For the first time he realised how long it really was, and exclaimed:
' "Well, it must be admitted that my nose is too long!'
In an instant the crystal prison flew into a thousand splinters, and the old Fairy, taking the Dear Little Princess by the hand, said to the Prince :
' Now, say if you are not very much obliged to me. Much good it was for me to talk to you about your nose ! You would never have found out how extraordinary it was if it hadn't hindered you from doing what you wanted to. You see how self-love keeps us from knowing our own defects of mind and body. Our reason-tries in vain to show them to us ; we refuse to see them till we find them in the way of our interests.'
Prince Hyacinth, whose nose was now just like anyone else's, did not fail to profit by the lesson he had received. He married the Dear Little Princess, and they lived happily ever after.1
1 Le Prince Ditir et la Piincetse Mignonne. Par Madame Leprince de Beaumont.
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