The Blue Fairy Book - online childrens book

Illustrated classic fairy tales for children by Andrew Lang

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kings to lose for ever the hope of marrying the Princess; but after all Bellissima could not have married twenty kings—indeed, she had found it quite difficult enough to choose one, for her vanity made her believe that there was nobody in the world who was worthy of her.
Preparations were begun at once for the grandest wedding that had ever been held at the palace. The King of the Gold Mines sent such im­mense sums of money that the whole sea was covered with the ships that brought it. Messengers were sent to all the gayest and most refined Courts, particularly to the Court of France, to seek out everything rare and precious to adorn the Prin­cess, although her beauty was so perfect that nothing she wore could make her look prettier. At least that is what the King of the Gold Mines thought, and he was never happy unless he was with her.
As for the Princess, the more she saw of the King the more she liked him ; he was so generous, so hand­some and clever, that at last she was almost as much in love with him as he was with her. How happy they were as they wandered about in the beautiful gardens together, sometimes listening to sweet music ! and the King used to write songs for Bellissima. This is one that she liked very much:
In the forest all is gay When my Princess walks that way. All the blossoms then are found Downward fluttering to the ground,
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