The Blue Fairy Book - online childrens book

Illustrated classic fairy tales for children by Andrew Lang

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THE YELLOW DWARF                        39
it was easy to see by his face how happy he was, and everyone who went near him returned loaded with presents, for all round the great banqueting hall had been arranged a thousand barrels full of gold, and numberless bags made of velvet embroidered with pearls and filled with money, each one containing at least a hundred thousand gold pieces, which were given away to everyone who liked to hold out his hand, which numbers of people hastened to do, you may be sure—indeed, some found this by far the most amusing part of the wedding festivities.
The Queen and the Princess were just ready to set out with the King when they saw, advancing towards them from the end of the long gallery, two great basilisks, dragging after them a very badly made box; behind them came a tall old woman, whose ugliness was even more surprising than her extreme old age. She wore a ruff of black taffeta, a red velvet hood, and a farthingale all in rags, and she leaned heavily upon a crutch. This strange old woman, without saying a single word, hobbled three times round the gallery, followed by the basilisks, then stopping in the middle, and brandishing her crutch threateningly, she cried :
' Ho, ho, Queen ! Ho, ho, Princess! Ho you think you are going to break with impunity the promise that you made to my friend the Yellow Dwarf? I am the Fairy of the Desert; without the Yellow Dwarf and his orange tree my great lions would soon have eaten you up, I can tell you, and in Fairyland we do not suffer ourselves to be insulted like this. Make up your minds at once what you will do, for I vow that you shall marry the Yellow Dwarf. If you don't, may I burn my crutch !'
' Ah I Princess,' said the Queen, weeping, ' what is this that I hear ? What have you promised ? '
' Ah! my mother,' replied Bellissima sadly, ' what did you promise, yourself? '
The King of the Gold Mines, indignant at being kept from his happiness by this wicked old woman, went up to her, and threaten­ing her with his sword, said :
' Get away out of my country at once, and for ever, miserable creature, lest I take your life, and so rid myself of your malice.'
He had hardly spoken these words when the lid of the box fell back on the floor with a terrible noise, and to their horror out sprang the Yellow Dwarf, mounted upon a great Spanish cat. ' Kash youth !' he cried, rushing between the Fairy of the Desert and the King. ' Dare to lay a finger upon this illustrious Fairy!
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