The Blue Fairy Book - online childrens book

Illustrated classic fairy tales for children by Andrew Lang

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Your quarrel is with me only. I am your enemy and your rival. That faithless Princess who would have married you is promised to me. See if she has not upon her finger a ring made of one of
my hairs. Just try to take it off, and you will soon find out that I am more powerful than you are!'
' Wretched little mon­ster !' said the King; ' do you dare to call yourself the Princess's lover, and to lay claim to such a treasure ? Do you know that you are a dwarf— that you are so ugly that one cannot bear to look at you—and that I should have killed you myself long before this if you had been worthy of such a glorious death'?' The Yellow Dwarf, deeply enraged at these words, set spurs to his cat, which yelled hor­ribly, and leapt hither and thither—terrifying everybody except the brave King, who pursued the Dwarf closely, till he, drawing a great knife with which he was armed, challenged the King to meet him in single combat, and rushed down into the courtyard of the palace with a terrible clatter. The King, quite provoked, followed him hastily, but they had hardly taken their places facing one another, and the whole Court had only just had time to rush out upon the balconies to watch what was going on, when suddenly the sun became as red as blood, and it was so dark that they could scarcely see at all. The thunder crashed, and the lightning seemed as if it must burn up everything; the two basilisks appeared, one on each side of the bad Dwarf, like giants, mountains high, and fire flew from their mouths and ears, until they looked like flaming furnaces. None of these things could terrify the noble young King, and the boldness of his looks and actions
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