The Blue Fairy Book - online childrens book

Illustrated classic fairy tales for children by Andrew Lang

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led him on in spite of himself. At last they came to two mountains divided by a narrow valley. ' We will go no farther,' said the false uncle. ' I will show you something wonderful; only do you gather up sticks while I kindle a fire.' When it was lit the magician threw on it a powder he had about him, at the same time saying some magical words. The earth trem­bled a little and opened in front of them, disclosing a square flat stone with a brass ring in the middle to raise it by. Aladdin tried to run away, but the magician caught him and gave him a blow that knocked him down. ' What have I done, uncle ? ' he said piteously; whereupon the magician said more kindly:' Fear nothing, but obey me. Beneath this stone lies a treasure which is to be yours, and no one else may touch it, so you must do exactly as I tell you.' At the word trea­sure Aladdin forgot his fears, and grasped the ring
as he was told, saying the names of his father and grandfather. The stone came up quite easily, and some steps appeared. ' Go down,' said the magician; ' at the foot of those steps you will find an open door leading into three large halls. Tuck up your gown and go through them without touching anything, or you will die instantly. These halls lead into a garden of fine fruit trees. Walk on till you come to a niche in a terrace where stands a lighted lamp. Pour out the oil it contains, and bring it me.' He drew a ring from h.'s finger and gave it to Aladdin, bidding him prosper.
Aladdin found everything as the magician had said, gathered some fruit off the trees, and, having got the lamp, arrived at the mouth of the cave. The magician cried out in a great hurry : ' Make
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