The Blue Fairy Book - online childrens book

Illustrated classic fairy tales for children by Andrew Lang

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The King could not see any cause for anger either when the matter was presented to him in this light, and he began to frown very fiercely at the courtiers who had so misrepresented his favourite.
So he took Charming back to the palace with him, and after seeing that he had a very good supper he said to him :
' You know that I love Pretty Goldilocks as much as ever, her refusal has not made any difference to me ; but I don't know how to make her change her mind: I really should like to send you, to see if you can persuade her to marry me.'
Charming replied that he was perfectly willing to go, and would set out the very next day.
' But you must wait till I can get a grand escort for you,' said the King. But Charming said that he only wanted a good horse to ride, and the King, who was delighted at his being ready to start so promptly, gave him letters to the Princess, and bade him good speed. It was on a Monday morning that he set out all alone upon his errand, thinking of nothing but how he could persuade the Princess Goldilocks to marry the King. He had a writing-book in his pocket, and whenever any happy thought struck him he dismounted from his horse and sat down under the trees to put it into the harangue which he was preparing for the Princess, before he forgot it.
One day when he had started at the very earliest dawn, and was riding over a great meadow, he suddenly had a capital idea, and, springing from his horse, he sat down under a willow tree which
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