The Blue Fairy Book - online childrens book

Illustrated classic fairy tales for children by Andrew Lang

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266
THE GOOSE-GIRL
O NCE upon a time an old queen, whose husband had been dead for many years, had a beautiful daughter. When she grew up she was betrothed to a prince who lived a great way off. Now, when the time drew near for her to be married and to depart into a foreign kingdom, her old mother gave her much costly baggage, and many ornaments, gold and silver, trinkets and knicknacks, and, in fact, everything that belonged to a royal trousseau, for she loved her daughter very dearly. She gave her a waiting-maid also, who was to ride with her and hand her over to the bridegroom, and she pro­vided each of them with a horse for the journey. Now the Princess's horse was called Falada, and could speak.
When the hour for departure drew near the old mother went to her bedroom, and taking a small knife she cut her fingers till they bled; then she held a white rag under them, and letting three drops of blood fall into it, she gave it to her daughter, and said : ' Dear child, take great care of this rag : it may be of use to you on the journey.'
So they took a sad farewell of each other, and the Princess stuck the rag in front of her dress, mounted her horse, and set forth on the journey to her bridegroom's kingdom. After they had ridden for about an hour the Princess began to feel very thirsty, and said to her waiting-maid : ' Pray get down and fetch me some water in my golden cup out of yonder stream : I would like a drink.' ' If you're thirsty,' said the maid, ' dismount yourself, and lie down by the water and drink ; I don't mean to be your servant any longer.' The Princess was so thirsty that she got down, bent over the stream, and drank, for she wasn't allowed to drink out of the golden goblet. As she drank she murmured : ' Oh ! heaven, what am I to do ? ' and the three drops of blood replied :
' If your mother only knew,
Her heart would surely break in two.'
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