The Blue Fairy Book - online childrens book

Illustrated classic fairy tales for children by Andrew Lang

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in which he could see plainly the horrible creature he had become, and a voice said to him :
'Look carefully at the state to which your wickedness has brought you ; believe me, your soul is a thousand times more hideous than your body.'
Prince Darling recognised the voice of the Fairy Truth, and turned in a fury to catch her and eat her up if he possibly could; but he saw no one, and the same voice went on:
' I laugh at your powerlessness and anger, and I intend to punish your pride by letting you fall into the hands of your own subjects.'
The Prince began to think that the best thing he could do would be to get as far away from the lake as he could, then at least he would not be continually reminded of his terrible ugliness. So he ran towards the wood, but before he had gone many yards he fell into a deep pit which had been made to trap bears, and the hunters, who were hiding in a tree, leapt down, and secured him with several chains, and led him into the chief city of his own kingdom.
On the way, instead of recognising that his own faults had brought this punishment upon him, he accused the Fairy of being the cause of all his misfortunes, and bit and tore at his chains furiously.
As they approached the town he saw that some great rejoicing was being held, and when the hunters asked what had happened they were told that the Prince, whose only pleasure it was to torment his people, had been found in his room, killed by a thunder-bolt (for that was what was supposed to have become of him). Four of his courtiers, those who had encouraged him in his wicked doings, had tried to seize the kingdom and divide it between them, but the people, who knew it was their bad counsels which had so changed the Prince, had cut off their heads, and had offered the crown to Suliman, whom the Prince had left in prison. This noble lord had just been crowned, and the deliverance of the kingdom was the cause of the rejoicing. ' For,' they said, ' he is a good and just man, and we shall once more enjoy peace and prosperity.'
Prince Darling roared with anger when he heard this; but it was still worse for him when he reached the great square before his own palace. He saw Suliman seated upon a magnificent throne, and all the people crowded round, wishing him a long life that he might undo all the mischief done by his predecessor.
Presently Suliman made a sign with his hand that the people should be silent, and said: ' I have accepted the crown you have
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